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2015: YEAR IN REVIEW

<em>Great Scott</em>&nbsp;at The Dallas Opera

The Year in Music and Opera

Chief Classical Music and Opera critic Gregory Sullivan Isaacs picks his favorite performances of 2015.



published Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Let’s start with the oft-repeated complaint about a Top Ten list based on the calendar year. For most performing arts groups, everything is organized into a “season” that runs from September to May with a summer season that follows. When you look at performances yearly, you combine half of last season with half of the new one.  Considering that seasons are carefully planned (or should be) to fit together, a list such as this one becomes a hodgepodge of excellent performances, no doubt, but unconnected to the way they were presented. (Harrumph!)

Further, how can you compare the world premiere of a major new opera with a guitar recital? What about out of town performances that are an important a part of the local opera scene—like Santa Fe and Houston? Also, in our effort to cover as much as possible, many fine concerts cannot be included because my colleagues covered those so I didn’t hear them.

Thus, like last year’s list, the top performances are broken down into categories. Even then, picking between all of the excellent concerts that the Metroplex offered in 2015 was a daunting task. My initial list of candidates had 40 performances on it.

With all that said, here is the list. Rather than repeat all of my comments extensively made at the time, I will write enough to intrigue you, dear reader, to click on the link to the entire review.

 

TOP LOCAL OPERA PERFORMANCES

This was the most difficult list to prepare. Opera fans travel, so TheaterJones now sends me out of town for important performances or world premieres. Those have a separate sublist below. On top of that, there were six world premieres of important new operas. The Dallas Opera produced half of them: a remarkable achievement in itself.

 

 1  Great Scott

The Dallas Opera

Music by Jake Heggie | Libretto by Tony-winning playwright Terrence McNally

October 30

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

My review

Photo: Robert Hart/TheaterJones
From left, composer Jake Heggie, librettist Terrence McNally and director Jack O'Brien, of Great Scott at Dallas Opera

 

 

Here we have a fresh and sassy comedy that gets its material from a backstage look at the world of opera itself. McNally’s sparkling dialogue, unlikely situations and some perfect sendups of archetypical singers brought laughs from opera newbies and diehard fans alike. Add to the success, there was a Tony-winning director Jack O’Brien, the superb conducting of Patrick Summers and a stellar cast: Joyce DiDonato, Frederica von Stade, Nathan Gunn, Anthony Roth Costanzo, and a hysterical turn by Ailyn Pérez as the voracious young diva-to-be. It runs a little long and needs editing, but so do most new operas. There are too many endings, but you would be hard pressed to decide on which ones should stay or go.

 

 

 2  Everest

The Dallas Opera

Music by Joby Talbot | Libretto by Gene Scheer

January 30

AT&T Performing Arts Center, Winspear Opera House

My review

Photo: Karen Almond
Everest at the Dallas Opera

 

Definitely not a comedy, Everest is based on the harrowing events of a climbing expedition that went horribly wrong. Here is how I described it at the time: “When it was all over, Everest has to be considered a resounding success, a genre-bending coup de théâtre. It is almost unclassifiable. It is certainly operatic in its vocal writing and that it is sung throughout. Yet, it has much in common with experimental theater.

Much of the credit for the gripping performance goes to conductor Nicole Paiement, who calmly kept a superb young cast of singing actors and a large, multilayer and thickly scored orchestra precisely under control. Robert Brill’s white boxes, that filled the entire proscenium of the Winspire opera House, mimicked the mountain in that climbers had to negotiate them with the same difficulty and climbing equipment. Elaine J. McCarthy’s projections added the snow and craggy landscape.

 

 

 3  Hamlet

The Fort Worth Opera

Music by Ambroise Thomas | Libretto by Michel Carre and Jules Barbier

May 1

Bass Performance Hall, Fort Worth

My review

Photo: Fort Worth Opera
Wes Mason in Hamlet at Fort Worth Opera

 

This is an opera that is rarely seen and considered to be overly French-ish, burdened with a ridiculously inappropriate happy ending—for Hamlet—and in a dated musical language. It is only revived on rare occasions solely as a vehicle for a star baritone with great acting chops. Such was the case in Fort Worth in May as Wes Mason took on the role and they used Thomas’ later revision restoring something closer to original ending. He was assisted in bringing this opera out of mothballs by Talise Trevigne, an equally terrific Ophelia. The entire experience started in the lobby when we arrived as Director Thaddeus Strassberger transported us to some unnamed military state.

 

 

 4  Villa y Corte

Orchestra of New Spain

February 13

Dallas City Performance Hall

My review

 

Artistic Director Grover Wilkins III and the ONS specializes in the music of the Baroque in Spain and in Mexico played on historically correct instruments and with performance practices. But lately, he recreates Baroque operas exactly (or as close as possible) to the way things were staged, acted and costumed. Such productions were common back in the days when courts furnished their own entertainment. ONS gave us a taste of what that was like with these five short tonadilla-style comic operatic sketches.

 

 

OUT OF TOWN OPERA PREMIERES

 

 1  Cold Mountain

Santa Fe Opera

Music by Jennifer Higdon | Libretto by Gene Scheer

July

My review

Photo: Ken Howard/Santa Fe Opera
Cold Mountain at Santa Fe Opera

 

Higdon’s first opera—co-commissioned by Santa Fe Opera, Opera Philadelphia and Minnesota Opera, in collaboration with North Carolina Opera—was quite an event this summer, with dignitaries from all over the world and a PBS film crew on hand. No one knew what to expect from a composer best known for instrumental music. What she produced was successful both musically and dramatically. She wrote a basically neo-romantic score with a syllabic setting of Scheer’s taut reduction of Charles Frazier’s immense novel. At the time, reaching for a descriptor of the way the text was set, Sondheim’s musical-cum-operas came to mind. On further reflection, Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande is a better example.

Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra Musical Director Miguel Harth-Bedoya was a marvel on the podium and got excellent playing of some very difficult orchestral writing out of the Santa Fe orchestra. At the Curtis Institute where the composer teaches they say “It isn’t just plain hard, it’s Higdon hard!” She will certainly make changes, she made some between performances, but Cold Mountain has a future.

 

 

 2  Bel Canto

Chicago Lyric Opera

Music by Jimmy López | Libretto by Nilo Cruz

December

My review

Photo: Todd Rosenberg
Bel Canto at Chicago Lyric Opera

 

Bel Canto is another opera based on a successful book: the 2001 novel of the same name by Ann Patchett. It was turned into a libretto by by the Cuban-American playwright Nilo Cruz, who won the Pulitzer Prize for Anna in the Tropics. The kaleidoscope musical score is by the American but Peruvian-born composer Jimmy López, who has worked locally with the Fort Worth Symphony and its Peruvian music director Miguel Harth-Bedoya.

The story is about a gathering of A-list foreign dignitaries at an exclusive party in Peru that is invaded and held hostage. The libretto allows the international assemblage to speak in their own language, including Spanish, English, Japanese, Russian and even the indigenous Peruvian language of Quechua. (With English supertitles.) A strong cast, under the expert direction of Kevin Newbury, keeps the action realistic and constantly in motion without becoming busy. López’s music ranges from white-hot complexities to dreamy neo-romantic soaring lines. Music Director Andrew Davis is simply amazing as he leads the responsive large cast and orchestra through the complex score.

Like the other new operas mentioned, Bel Canto needs some minor editing, which it will surely receive, but the opera certainly carries the audience along from its quiet beginning to its tragic ending.

 

 

VISITING SYMPHONIC PERFORMANCES

This section is divided into two because of the very rare occurrence of a visiting orchestra to the Metroplex. We can thank the AT&T Performing Arts Center's Classical Criterion Series for these welcome events. Both visitors were outstanding and need equal praise.

 

 1  Colombian Youth Orchestra

AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Classical Criterion

Meyerson Symphony Center

July 9

My review

Photo: ATTPAC
Andrés Orozco-Estrada conducts the Colombian Youth Orchestra

 

Under the direction of Houston Symphony’s new music director Andrés Orozco-Estrada, Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 1 was given a ferocious performance by the magnificent cellist, Johannes Moser, even to the point of breaking a string and finishing on the instrument of the principal cellist. However, the most intense music-making was yet to come. Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring was given an appropriately barbaric performance worthy of any professional orchestra’s effort. However, its ballet origin was retained. It was subtly choreographed. Here is how I described it:

“As the ballet progressed, the players moved in waves, shimmied their instruments in such a way as to reflect the light in flashes. Instruments would rise up out of the orchestra and then disappear back into the crowd. Hands raised in choreographed motions, sometimes holding white cloths and percussionists’ sticks waved like semaphore on shipboard. Bows became weapons as the violin tribe threatened the neighboring tribe of violas and cellos.”

 

 

 2  Israel Philharmonic Orchestra

AT&T Performing Arts Center’s Classical Criterion

Meyerson Symphony Center

November 17

My review

Photo: Oded Antman
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra conductor Zubin Mehta

 

Under the direction of one of world’s great conductors, Zubin Mehta, this orchestra is a collection of some of the best musicians in the world. Mehta, in his understated yet vibrant way, has them working as a team, while still encouraging them to contribute their individual voices. While we may have been disappointed to see that they programmed Dvorak’s marvelous but overplayed New World Symphony, none felt that way after hearing it anew in this performance.

 

 

LOCAL ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCES

 

 1  The Damnation of Faust

Dallas Symphony Orchestra

Meyerson Symphony Center

November 12

My review

Photo: Steve J. Sherman
Conductor Jacques Lacombe

 

Hector Berlioz’s Damnation of Faust is rarely heard partly because of the immense forces required to produce it: Greatly augmented orchestra, a couple of different choruses, a children’s chorus and three operatic soloists. It is also famously difficult to play and also to conduct.  Both Joshua Habermann’s DSO chorus and Cynthia Nott’s Children’s Chorus of Greater Dallas turned in excellent performances. The relatively unknown guest conductor Jacques Lacombe, substituting for an ailing David Zinman, was marvelous. Let’s hope he returns soon.

 

 

 2, 3 & 4  Dallas Symphony Orchestra

(three-way tie)

Bernstein’s Symphony No. 3, “Kaddish” (May 17) My review

Mahler’s Symphony No. 3 (May 23) My review

Bruckner’s Symphony Nov. 5 (Oct. 15) My review

Meyerson Symphony Center

Photo: Kristina Bowman
Jaap van Zweden with the Dallas Symphony

 

This was a three-way tie among some remarkable performances of huge symphonic undertakings by the DSO under their stern Artistic Director, Jaap van Zweden. Two of them were, amazingly, one right after the other and part of the Soluna Festival. How the orchestra prepared both of these monster symphonies (in the midst of an exhausting festival) is a mystery, but prepare them they did. I will let you read my reviews and you decide: I couldn’t.

The Bruckner is an exhausting piece to play and also to experience. You have to leave earth time behind as you enter Bruckner’s heavenly and timeless musical edifice. Mahler’s equally long symphonies deal with the painful struggles of daily life and the shadow of our inevitable death. Bruckner’s symphonies leave such mundane earthy matters behind as they ascend, reaching for the divine. This may sound rather purple, but it is the best way to think about Bruckner’s symphonies.

 

 

 5  Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra

Prokofiev’s piano concerti with Vadym Kholodenko

Piano Concerto No. 5 (March 27) My review

Piano Concerto Nos. 1 and 4 (Oct. 23) Andrew Anderson’s review

Bass Performance Hall, Fort Worth

Photo: The Cliburn
Vadmy Kholodenko

 

The magical alliance of the Fort Worth Symphony, Artistic Director Miguel Harth-Bedoya and Cliburn 2013 Gold Medalist, Vadym Kholodenko, that has resulted in a series of concerts featuring all of the arduous and primal piano concerti of Sergei Prokofiev. My colleague, Andrew Anderson, reviewed the incendiary performances of Prokofiev’s first concerto and then his fourth, as if on a dare, with one hand tied behind his back. Actually, please excuse my levity, No. 4 was written for the left hand only for pianist Paul Wittgenstein, who lost his right hand in WWI. (He also commissioned similar concerti from composers such as Maurice Ravel.)

I reviewed a performance of the fifth concerto. Word has it that recordings of all five concerti will be released in the near future.

 

 

CHAMBER MUSIC

 

 1  Music on the Brink of War

Soundings at the Nasher

Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas

May 20

My review

Photo: Nasher Sculpture Center
Music from the Brink of War in the Soundings Series

 

The Soundings concert series at the Nasher Sculpture Center, under the artistic direction of Seth Knopp, is always fascinating in that it presents the music of our time; from works that have become standards to the wildly experimental. As such, there are some boffo hits and some near misses. The concert on May 30, part of the Soluna Festival, had such a combination. The misfire was an overly long and obtuse cabaret show by Michael Haslam: a musical pastiche of songs by Kurt Weil on poems by Bertold Brecht. However, the concert rose to transcendent levels, and got a Top Ten listing, for the remarkable performance of Schoenberg’s usually incomprehensible Pierrot Lunaire.

This is the result of an astounding performance by Lucy Shelton of the half-sung half spoken esoteric poems. These usually obtuse and symbolic poems, by Albert Giraud as translated by Otto Erich Hartleben, came into sharp focus in her amazing performance. She offered the story in such a way as to give us a complete comprehension of what is happening, for the first time for many of us (even for those us, such as this writer, who knew the work).

A personal note: Of course, I am a huge fan of the transformative music of Arnold Schoenberg and in awe of his far-reaching influence, so that might explain this statement, in part. Although I swore that I would never pick just one, this performance of Pierrot Lunaire has to qualify for my most memorable musical experience of 2015.

 

 

 2  Tibet Fantasia

Voices of Change

Southern Methodist University, Caruth Auditorium, Dallas

March 15

My review

Photo: Danielle Deraleau/TheaterJones
Xi Wang rehearses with Voices of Change for the premiere of her Tibet Fantasia

 

Voices of Change has a decades-long international reputation for presenting new music and an impressive catalog of commissions and recordings. In March, they presented a new commission, Tibet Fantasia by Xi Wang, who is on the faculty at Southern Methodist University. My preview of that work is here. The work is really a theater piece for singers and a chamber ensemble, with the players spread around the inside of Caruth Auditorium. As I said in my review: “Drums thunder and a gentle rain falls, thanks to rain sticks. Bells ring and bowl rims hum.” Countertenor Vinnie Mahal, a student of voice professor Virginia Dupuy at SMU, was outstanding as he conveyed a wide range of emotions in a made-up language.

 

 

 3  Unrequited Love

Blue Candlelight Music Series

Private Home, Dallas

May 15

Robin Coffelt’s review

Photo: DSO
DeMarre McGill

 

Although I didn’t review this concert (but attended), The Blue Candlelight Music Series house concert on May 22 gave us an in-depth look at the new principal flutist of the DSO: Demarre McGill. We expected him to be really good, even exceptional, but he is something else again. You have to experience his playing to understand the level he is on.

Also on the program was DSO principal horn David Cooper, and DSO concertmaster Alex Kerr and Blue Candlelight music director pianist Baya Kakouberi. Brahms’ Horn Trio, a personal favorite, ended the program. Cooper is another phenomenal young player and it was terrific to hear him play it with these other two artists.

 

 

 4  Dover String Quartet

Dallas Chamber Music Society

Southern Methodist University, Caruth Auditorium, Dallas

Nov. 9

My review

Photo: Dover Quartet
The Dover String Quartet

 

The Dallas Chamber Music Society brings us a sampling of the best of the brilliant young touring ensembles on the road today. Such was the case in November when they presented the Dover String Quartet. They first came to notice when they won all the prizes at the 2013 highly prestigious Banff International String Quartet Competition: the grand prize and all three special prizes. Thus, there was quite a bit of anticipation to hear them play in person and they did not disappoint. You could hardly imagine a more diverse program: Dvořák’s “American” string quartet, Alban Berg’s emotional and atonal String Quartet No. 3, and Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 7, Op. 59, No. 1.

 

 

 5  Jack of Two Trades

Chamber Music Society of Fort Worth

Nov. 14

Kimbell Art Museum, Piano Pavilion, Fort Worth

My review

Photo: Michael Klotz
Violist Michael Klotz

 

The Chamber Music Society of Fort Worth presented Schubert’s “Trout” Quintet, which is remarkable in the literature because it is not written for the standard: piano and string quartet. Schubert writes for a bass, eliminating the second violin. When you hear it, you cannot help but wonder why composers didn’t jump on the inclusion of the bass. (None have, so far, except for a septet by Johann Hummel.) Ever since Artistic Director Gary Levinson (also Senior Associate Concertmaster of the Dallas Symphony) took over this moribund concert series, it has flourished and it is gratifying to see that success continue into a second season. This performance is demonstrative of the reasons why: he features outstanding performers. In addition to Levinson, there was Jon Nakamatsu, piano; Michael Klotz, viola; Carter Brey, cello (Principal Cellist of the New York Philharmonic); and Nicolas Tsolainos, double bass (Principal Double Bass of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra).

 

 

ALSO WORTH MENTIONING

Although it was too expansive to list as a Top Ten performance, the first Cliburn Junior Piano Competition was a big success. If you wondered where all of the impeccably prepared pianists come from for the main Cliburn, attending the Junior gave you an advanced peak at who will be in future competitions. I reviewed every performance and they can be found in a collection on TheaterJones. Here is the story on the winners, which links to reviews of the finals.

In that same vein, the Fort Worth Opera’s Frontiers program continues to give us a taste of nascent and nearly established opera composers. Works are chosen form hundreds submitted and then work shopped, selected scenes or entire works if they are short enough, by the talented group of apprentice singers. My review of all of the 2015 selections is here.

 

 

 2015: Year in Review 

  • Monday, Dec. 28 Margaret Putnam's Year in Dance
  • Monday, Dec. 28 Cheryl Callon's thoughts on the year in dance
  • Monday, Dec. 28 Katie Dravenstott's thoughts on the year in dance
  • Monday, Dec. 28 Columnist Danielle Georgiou's Year
  • Tuesday, Dec. 29 Gregory Sullivan Isaacs' Year in Classical Music and Opera
  • Tuesday, Dec. 29 J. Robin Coffelt's thoughts on the year in classical music
  • Tuesday, Dec. 29 M. Lance Lusk's Year in Shakespeare
  • Wednesday, Dec. 30 Jan Farrington's thoughts on the year in theater
  • Wednesday, Dec. 30 Martha Heimberg's thoughts on the year in theater
  • Wednesday, Dec. 30 David Novinski's thoughts on the year in theater
  • Thursday, Dec. 31 Amy Martin's thoughts on the year in comedy
  • Friday, Jan. 1 Mark Lowry's Year in Theater
  • Sunday, Jan. 10 TheaterJones writers look forward to 2016
  • Monday, Jan. 11 The top performing arts news of the year
 Thanks For Reading




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The Year in Music and Opera
Chief Classical Music and Opera critic Gregory Sullivan Isaacs picks his favorite performances of 2015.
by Gregory Sullivan Isaacs

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